(Source: chai-with-tai)

(Reblogged from pie-is-my-soulmate)

dcu:

dresdencodak:

gailsimone:

dbvictoria:

Gail Simone is on a tear on twitter this morning.

I said some stuff.

Read this.

Important.

(Reblogged from dcu)

Pen and Bristol paper. I was bored one evening and went on a drawing spree. These were the results.

Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think ‘it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.’ And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that.

Violet Socks, Patriarchy in Action: The New York Times Rewrites History (via o1sv)

Reblogging again for that paragraph because that is the part we forget the most.

(via girlwiki)

(Source: sendforbromina)

(Reblogged from fabula-unica)

amomenttoflove:

This is the species that invented space flight

(Source: starlightinherveins)

(Reblogged from tsundere-batsy)

asubmissiveintraining:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

 

OMFG THIS NEEDS TO BE MY MANTRA FUCKING WHITE MEN INTERRUPT ME ALL THE FUCKING TIME

(Reblogged from fabula-unica)

cornflakepizza:

Jason’s comic appearances, shown from his point of view. Just phenomenal.

Parts 1 2 3 4 by jaybru1, or read in order here.

(Reblogged from celestialstar92-deactivated2014)
(Reblogged from tsundere-batsy)

fabula-unica:

protagonistically:

taggingtim:

There are so many things I love about this issue.  Bruce shows off his protective side (as well as his bare-chested side).  He and Tim go up against Firefly.  Tim gets knocked out, and Bruce has to make sure he gets out of danger.  He tosses his son Tim over his shoulder and hauls him out danger.

My absolute favorite thing about this issue, and the part that sticks in my mind, is what happens to Bruce’s back.  Bruce shields Tim from Firefly’s blast, which is how he gets burned.  When Tim asks about it, though, he explains it away by saying he, Bruce, got careless.  I think this reflects on how well Bruce knows Tim.  Tim has a tendency to take every little mistake on his shoulders and dwell on them.  Bruce knows that, and rather than give Tim one more thing to beat himself up for, he brushes the injury off as his own fault.  It’s very sweet.

I also love how Tim and Alfred are in cahoots.  They both think that Bruce needs to stay in and heal up, so Alfred sedates him. 

Detective Comics 715

*dying whale noises*

I also love the way Bruce tipped backwards in the last panel.

(Reblogged from fabula-unica)

fabula-unica:

protagonistically:

taggingtim:

There are so many things I love about this issue.  Bruce shows off his protective side (as well as his bare-chested side).  He and Tim go up against Firefly.  Tim gets knocked out, and Bruce has to make sure he gets out of danger.  He tosses his son Tim over his shoulder and hauls him out danger.

My absolute favorite thing about this issue, and the part that sticks in my mind, is what happens to Bruce’s back.  Bruce shields Tim from Firefly’s blast, which is how he gets burned.  When Tim asks about it, though, he explains it away by saying he, Bruce, got careless.  I think this reflects on how well Bruce knows Tim.  Tim has a tendency to take every little mistake on his shoulders and dwell on them.  Bruce knows that, and rather than give Tim one more thing to beat himself up for, he brushes the injury off as his own fault.  It’s very sweet.

I also love how Tim and Alfred are in cahoots.  They both think that Bruce needs to stay in and heal up, so Alfred sedates him. 

Detective Comics 715

*dying whale noises*

I also love the way Bruce tipped backwards in the last panel.

(Reblogged from fabula-unica)